7 Tips on Creating a Complex Antagonist

When I first developed my story for Netherworld, I just created a villain simply so that my protagonist had some evil to fight against. But when I started questioning my villain’s motives, I realized that to have a full story, it is crucial to develop the villain because that’s the crux of the problems that create the story. Your villain is what drives your story; not just your protagonist’s motives, though those are important too.

There are no set rules for creating a villain; but there are guidelines, sure. Based on my experience, I have some advice on creating a well developed and complex villain. These are just my ideas and thoughts, and these may differ for many other writers (in which case, you can leave your own thoughts and opinions in the comment section below).

7 Tips on Creating a Complex Antagonist - Tea with Tumnus

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The Birth of a Character: Angela Warthog

“Here is a secret. A very important secret. And it will change your perspective of Angela Warthog. I see you are able to  judge her very easily by the mention of her odd name, and you may not have much of a perspective yet, but here it is: Angela Warthog is a long wanted criminal.”

Angela Warthog in California from the Warthog Chronicles

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Movie Critique: Ant-man

At first, I wasn’t sure what to think about the ant-sized superhero that was coming soon to theaters. I couldn’t help but think, “Wait, so we have a Batman and a Spiderman. Now … Ant-man?” So, I went into the theater with low expectations; high expectations could disappoint. But, surprisingly, I actually liked the movie enough to give time to writing up a good critique on it, because good movies deserve good critiques. And I won’t be as brutal as I was in the God’s Not Dead post, so don’t worry. That one was … yeah, a lot of fun on my part.

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Writing Tips: Quirks – The Pros and Cons

I’m sure all you writers have heard that your characters need quirks … especially your major characters, such as the protagonist and antagonist. Foreshadowing and background adds quirks to the character, makes him unique. Especially if the quirk has an effect on the story and ties in with the character’s personality, his problems or desire. It can be a subtle quirk, an oddity, an out-of-place physical appearance, a gait, the way she talks while twisting her hair, even his tendency to say “UM” very loudly in the middle of sentence transition. They can also make your characters memorable and even act as a symbol to remember a character by. Jack Sparrow, for example, has that strange, (and yet awesome) walk of his which communicates that his character is a bit off the rocker. Ahab has that wooden peg for a leg because Moby Dick bit it off during their first encounter, which is why he now wants vengeance upon Moby Dick in the story.

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