3 Writing Exercises with Music

Sometimes you need to take a break from your main writing project. Spending all your writing time on just one project can get overwhelming and you might notice that your coffee fuel starts draining faster the longer and more often you spend working on one particular story. When it comes to my writing for Fiction’s Lie, schoolwork and essay writing has forced it aside. And when push comes to shove, my actual novel writing topples out of the once beautiful picture.

But, putting the school work and non-creative writing aside, it’s important to take breaks. And one of the best ways spending those breaks is working on another writing project. It doesn’t matter what kind of writing that is. It can be a poem, a random scene, experimenting with characters, dialog, action scenes, description, you name it. I call these writing breaks writing exercises because not only do you give you a fresh mind and some time away from your big WIP project, they also strengthen your writing, so that when you come back to your WIP after that break, you’ll feel rejuvenated and armed with some skills or scenes or new ideas to add to your manuscript.

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In Which I Discuss the Best Weapons in the World

In case you don’t understand this blog post’s title:

Doctor Who books.gif

You’re welcome.

So, quite obviously, I’ll be talking about books today. I was recently tagged by the epic Aria Maher for the Writer’s Book Tag, and I couldn’t ever pass up an opportunity to talk about books, hence this post. To name a few, I’ll talk about a book I’ve never read, a book that has made me cry, and a favorite fantasy novel I recommend.

Let’s get to it, shall we?

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Fixing Tropes in Fantasy Fiction

The Google dictionary defines the fantasy genre as “a genre of imaginative fiction involving magic and adventure, especially in a setting other than the real world.” With fantasy, you have freedom. You can make whatever you want possible. You can create your own worlds, your own species, your own rules and laws. And yet, fantasy does have its stereotypes. And that’s okay. I find a lot of similarities between my writing and many other fantasy books I’ve read. Tropes aren’t necessarily a bad thing, unless you’re relying on them in an attempt to box your story into a particular genre. If you’re a fantasy writer who’s struggling with eliminating stereotypes, or if you’re any kind of author who wants a fun and slightly sarcastic post to read, you may benefit from the following tropes and the possible alternatives for each.

Fixing Tropes in Fantasy Fiction - Tea with Tumnus

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The Emotionally Agonizing Life of a Bookworm, Fangirl, and Writer

Okay, so I know the title of this post is sort of weird. But if you are an avid reader, serious writer, or big fan to any extent, you may find such a post appetizing. After all, us readers, writers, and geeks tend to enjoy harrowing stories that follow characters who are thrown into very tough hardships. But why would we call this emotionally harrowing? I’ve got some answers to that question below, as well as reasons for why it’s important and worth struggling with those deep emotions over stories that never happened.

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History Helps You Write: Weapon Inspiration for Fantasy Fiction

“Ugh. Trying to break the stereotype … but the only weapon I can picture my character using is just a sword. My other character uses a bow and arrow, but everyone’s going to start picturing a guy with long perfect hair and elf ears. How do I create unique  weapons instead of giving my characters just some plain old dagger or pistol?”

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Characters and Actors: R. I. P. Christopher Lee

Christopher Lee
Christopher Lee

Five days ago on June 7, 2015 at 8:30 A.M., renowned movie actor Christopher Lee passed away at the ripe old age of 93 years from heart failure. Many of us know him as the villain from the epics Lord of the Rings, the Hobbit, Star Wars, and Dracula, and played in 206 films in his acting career including a couple Sherlock Holmes films, The Three Musketeers, Spielburg’s 1941, 1979’s Captain America II, 2005’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Alice in Wonderland, and Hugo as well as six of Tim Burton’s films. He set the record for the most films with a swordfight by an actor. He is also the oldest video game voice actor and was a heavy metal vocalist (who would have thought?).Read More »